Picture of Kerri Freda
Collaboration -A 21st Century Skill
by Kerri Freda - Tuesday, July 15, 2014, 3:15 PM
 

Andrew Churches took Bloom’s Taxonomy of cognitive objectives and applied it to today’s technology.  Offering insight on how Bloom’s thinking processes from lower-order thinking skills to higher-order thinking skills can be achieved through technology,   Bloom’s two highest-order thinking skills are considered to be evaluating and creating, which can be achieved through various 21st century tools.  Ttoday’s world in which communication is increasingly focused, collaboration is a key aspect and is one of the most important and increasing features in today’s education.

  • Please read Churches; article 
  • http://www.techlearning.com/techlearning/archives/2008/04/andrewchurches.pdf
  • Please select one of Bloom's elements and state how it can be used in an online digital community and how it can promote higher-learning for 21st century students.
  • Please write one paragraph and respond to two classmates.
 
Picture of Fonda Lewis
Re: Collaboration -A 21st Century Skill
by Fonda Lewis - Tuesday, July 15, 2014, 8:18 PM
 

The highest element of Bloom's Taxonomy is considered creating.  Creating is definitely demonstrates deep understanding of concepts.  You not only have to know a concept, but you have to understand and make use of the content. With technology students can create a wide variety of things.  Some examples in Church's article were creating wikis, blogging, videoing, and podcasting to name a few.  All of these creations using technology could be used for a wide variety of students, both young children, teenagers and adults in an online setting.  See the following link apps that work with all of Bloom's elements.

http://www.schrockguide.net/bloomin-apps.html

How can we help students be successful with creations using technology?  I believe one way is by teacher or facilitator modeling using information to create something.  For example, in the elementary classroom I could demonstrate how I used new information about communities to create a podcast and a fictional digital story.  Then with expectations clearly stated and with students understanding how they would be assessed could work on creations collaboratively or in groups.

Picture of Kerri Freda
Re: Collaboration -A 21st Century Skill
by Kerri Freda - Friday, July 18, 2014, 4:39 PM
 

Hi Fonda:

You and I speak the same language with regards to the tools that students can use to create but they can also use those tools to collaborate, edit, listen, etc. I agree that digital storytelling is a great tool for the younger ages but also for older students. I have had 5th graders use photostory to create digital book trailers and for older students to create stories of the lives of important historical figures. I have also had students use Audacity and Garageband to create podcasts. Students paired up and pretending to interview important inventors. 

How about using digital storytelling to add interest to poetry by having the students tell the poem with photos, text and narration?   I also feel that a podcast could be used to tell alternative endings to stories or reader's theatre.

Picture of Jeremiah Stanley
Re: Collaboration -A 21st Century Skill
by Jeremiah Stanley - Thursday, July 17, 2014, 9:55 AM
 

There are two of Booms elements that I feel that are at the core of any student learning and interacting. Remembering and underrating, before you can have meaningful interaction you have to know how to access the information and understand how to use the tools. There can be assumptions made that all student will know how to use the technology and everyone is at the same level. For the most part this is not the case and the student that lack the skills needed could be at a disadvantage in there learning.

As an educator I would have tools available for student to practice as many times as they would like so they can remember and understand how to use the tools for the class. Doing this would give all student the opportunity to be successful in the class.

Picture of Kerri Freda
Re: Collaboration -A 21st Century Skill
by Kerri Freda - Friday, July 18, 2014, 4:34 PM
 

Hi Jeremiah:

I understand that is is important for students to remember but what exactlly do you want them to remember?  As a social studies teacher, I do not feel that  memorize dates and such is as important as students to be able to apply and interpret the facts or information. If students forget some information, they can look it up on the Internet. The PARCC and Common Core are going into the direction that students have to be able to use the concepts that they are learning.

For Math that deals with memorization of times-tables and formulas, students absolutely have to remember and use their memory.

Picture of Jeremiah Stanley
Re: Collaboration -A 21st Century Skill
by Jeremiah Stanley - Friday, July 18, 2014, 5:59 PM
 

Hi Kerri,

I am in assessment in E-learning also and we are covering authentic assessment and the need to test more than student ability to take a test. I think that is great that common core is beginning to use formative assessment and make sure student can use the concepts that they are learning.

One of the challenges I have found is how do you create assessment that balance time on the instructor and student side and truly engage the student and there knowledge level. I have no clear cut answer but I hope the combination of classes in the master program will get me closer to an answer.

Jeremiah Stanley

Picture of Kerri Freda
Re: Collaboration -A 21st Century Skill
by Kerri Freda - Saturday, July 19, 2014, 1:13 PM
 

Agreed that just as we need to vary a traditional test with different components; T or F, multiple choice, fill in the blanks and essay. We also need to assess students in other ways. I use project based assessments, student created technology as assessments, and art assessments to name a few.  Some students are not great test takers but that does not mean that they can not show that they mastered the material in other ways of assessment, which to me shows more than a test. 

Example: When my students were studying weather, I did not give them a written test. Instead they collaborated in groups to create a weather broadcast on a weather event of their choosen, like blizzard, flash floods, etc. Students had to  meet certain criteria like posting safety tips.  Students applied the information in a real life sitation; more valuable than just taking a test I feel. 

Picture of Patricia Richards
Re: Collaboration -A 21st Century Skill
by Patricia Richards - Friday, July 18, 2014, 5:11 PM
 
  • Please select one of Bloom's elements and state how it can be used in an online digital community and how it can promote higher-learning for 21st century students.

Bloom's element "Understanding" is one of the important elements necessary for learning.  After participating in online discussion groups in this course; it has shown me that discussion boards are a good way to relay understanding through text. Students can share their understanding of course topics based upon instructor promts.  Instructing students to post in their own words information about a topic will promote true learning instead of just memorization.  Based upon the content of the post it will be clearer to the teacher if undertanding has been met.

 

 

Picture of Kristen McGowan
Re: Collaboration -A 21st Century Skill
by Kristen McGowan - Friday, July 18, 2014, 11:02 PM
 

Patricia,

In my own usage of discussion prompts as a tool to check for student understanding, I do notice that it is key to create a prompt that requires students to provide evidence using the reading as well as the expectation to connect the information with a resource that was outside of information provided in the class.  By doing this, it requires the student to demonstrate that they can transfer the content to another area and make greater, real-life connections.  I did appreciate your wording for "in your own words" to ensure that students are note just copying verbatim from the text.  

Picture of Kristen McGowan
Re: Collaboration -A 21st Century Skill
by Kristen McGowan - Friday, July 18, 2014, 10:57 PM
 

Please select one of Bloom's elements and state how it can be used in an online digital community and how it can promote higher-learning for 21st century students.

Creating:  I would find it incredibly advantageous for my students and telling to me as a teacher if my students created a blog to be used as a working portfolio for Physical Education.  Within this blog, I would expect that students keep a live journal of their nutrition and sleep habits as well as commentary regarding their daily workout results and how their lifestyle choices are working towards or against their personal SMART goals.  

I would also assign specific writing prompts that would cover fitness concepts introduced in class.  Perhaps, I assign a WORDLE that would be integrated into their blog that demonstrates their summation of a fitness topic.  Once again, the students would demonstrate their mastery of a topic by creating a visual graphic/design.  I think that the creation of a blog would allow students to reflect and see growth regarding wellness choices.  

Picture of Patricia Richards
Re: Collaboration -A 21st Century Skill
by Patricia Richards - Saturday, July 19, 2014, 8:23 AM
 

Hi Kristen,

I was just looking at Wordle online when I read your post.  I also found another Wordle like tool called Tagxedo where you can make the word cloud into various shapes.  

Patricia

DC
Re: Collaboration -A 21st Century Skill
by David Cook - Saturday, July 19, 2014, 6:07 PM
 

Bloom's APPLYING stage strikes me as the place to draw a line because I sense that education activities that focus on application will lead more to long-term memory than the previous two combined. 

To give an anecdote from my weekend - I'm tring, for the first time, do install baseboard trim in my house.  Three different people told me at the outset - "measure twice, cut once".  I remembered each time somebody said it that I'd heard it before.  didn't really understand at first, but then got the jist of the point.   And then, low and behold, the 4th piece of trim I cut, I rushed the measurement and was 3/4 of an inch short.  For white trim, that is a big gaping hole.  And it was that poor cut that left me short of painted baseboard, so I had to stop all my progress and get out the paint again and prep another piece to cut.   The application taught me the lesson that will stick with me for decades. 

In terms of digital community, application is requires some activity beyond simply reading or writing a prompt, it requires people to consider how the knowledge relates to their unique situation.  For that reason, I'll cite MOODLE.  (is that allowed?)   We as students don't use Moodle to learn, remember, or understand, we use it to apply what we've learned and discuss that with others.  Just like in this example, our direction from Kerri was to read a prompt, make an application, and post it here to a community.  I think this is getting a little meta, so I'll end here. 

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