Picture of Sharon Suchla
Using your reflective voice
by Sharon Suchla - Tuesday, May 19, 2015, 2:15 PM
 

In "Facilitating Online Learning", George Collison discusses a "palette of voices".  I like this analogy because I believe that teaching is an art that takes skills, techniques, talents, knowledge, etc.  I was most interested in the "reflective voice" for a few reasons.  First, because I am an educator and we know that we must continually reflect on our practice in order to improve.  Reflecting on our practice is actually one of our ten state educator standards.  Second, I was drawn to the reflective voice because I just finished a six day training called "Leadership and Coaching" where we learned how to lead educators through a reflective process to assist them in coming to their own conclusions and next steps in their practice.  In Chapter 5, which voice speaks most to you and why?

 
Cynthia Koons, RDH, MBA
Re: Using your reflective voice
by Cynthia Koons - Tuesday, May 19, 2015, 8:56 PM
 

Sharon,

I think the topic that is discussed will influence which voice a facilitator might choose.  As I read Chapter 5 from Facilitating Online Learning by George Collison, I tried to think of which voice I would select when discussing ethics to dental hygiene students, particularly ethical dilemmas.   Personal Muse is the voice I am interested in using.  Since there is no right or wrong in an ethical dilemma, this voice would allow me to help students to identify the ethical dilemma, determine the options, apply the ethical principle, and make a decision.

Cyndy

Picture of Sharon Suchla
Re: Using your reflective voice
by Sharon Suchla - Thursday, May 21, 2015, 10:32 AM
 

Using the "personal muse" seems like a good choice for that situation.  I am thinking that due to the scientific nature of your course, the "reflective voice" might be less useful?

Cynthia Koons, RDH, MBA
Re: Using your reflective voice
by Cynthia Koons - Thursday, May 21, 2015, 11:09 AM
 

Sharon,

Perhaps Reflective Voice might be less useful in this situation, but I cannot totally discount its merits.  I think that a different voice might be chosen for a different situation.  Being open-minded and trying to do whatever it takes to meet the learns' needs is best practice.

Cyndy

Picture of Lisa Fitzgerald
Re: Using your reflective voice
by Lisa Fitzgerald - Wednesday, May 20, 2015, 11:33 AM
 

Sharon,

I appreciate you posting this question as it really asks us to look at ourselves in a way that I don't always take time to do.  I'd say that I associate most with the conceptual facilitator voice since this "persona" allows me to ask the leading questions to keep students on topic, but also help lead them toward exploring their own ideas about what the class is discussing.  I like that Collison talks about the conceptual facilitator specifically as focusing on "elements of participants' postings, perhaps including juxtapostions from readings, and not on the delivery of content material in the intervention" (108).  Through use of this technique, I find that students are asked to take ownership of their own thoughts, and through proper questioning, they are able to come to conclusions that are reflections of their critical thinking abilities, most specifically analysis and synthesis. 

Picture of Sharon Suchla
Re: Using your reflective voice
by Sharon Suchla - Thursday, May 21, 2015, 2:32 PM
 

Lisa:

The second half of your post, "students are asked to take ownership of their own thoughts, and through proper questioning, they are able to come to conclusions that are reflections of their critical thinking abilities,...." is really what my leadership and coaching training was about.  I relate this to Chapter 5, Facilitating Online Learning, where Collison spoke of holding a mirror up to our students so that they take an outside look at themselves and gain a greater self awareness.

Picture of Anne Wilkinson
Re: Using your reflective voice
by Anne Wilkinson - Wednesday, May 20, 2015, 10:06 PM
 

Sharon,

I think that one could use all of these voices depending upon the situation and the subject matter being discussed . As you say, teaching is an art and knowing which vocie to use comes with experience.  I think that the most commonly used voice  at least for me would be the Generative Guide.  When noticing that the discussion is off topic or just skimming the surface, the Generative Guide voice can redirect, point out assumptions, and ask questions to drive the discussion deeper. I find that I do this both in my face-to-face classes and the online course that I teach.  

I'm wondering if others feel that they use one voice more often than others?

Anne

Picture of Sharon Suchla
Re: Using your reflective voice
by Sharon Suchla - Thursday, May 21, 2015, 10:45 AM
 

I agree, Anne, that one needs to use the "palette of voices".  A great teacher will be able to switch from one voice to another as needed.  I find this discussion interesting because it is forcing us to think about which voices we use and in which situations we choose to use them.  Collison's voices prompt me to think more deeply about my intentions when I speak whereas I may have just responded or reacted in the past without as much forethought. This is a great example of metacognition. 

Picture of Anne Wilkinson
Re: Using your reflective voice
by Anne Wilkinson - Friday, May 22, 2015, 11:27 AM
 

Metacognitiion...thinking about our thinking.  You are right, it is important to take a moment to consider our voices and when and how we use different voices.  I think that as a new teacher, I considered my approach to students and situations more frequently.  It is good to remind ourselves to do this no matter how lone we have been teaching.

Yellowstone
Re: Using your reflective voice
by Sheri Perez - Saturday, May 23, 2015, 1:13 PM
 

Hi Sharon,

It looks like we were both drawn to the same topic. :)

The conceptual facilitator is the voice I tend to use the most in my classes.  Economics tends to have several concepts that many students think they know, but then don’t understand why the questions are so difficult or their grades lower than expected.  I spend a great deal of time warning of upcoming pitfalls, reviewing commonly missed concepts in the previous quiz or assignment, or sending out private messages to redirect students to the text or videos for further review.

Sheri in Las Vegas

Picture of Sheilah Smith
Re: Using your reflective voice
by Sheilah Smith - Sunday, May 24, 2015, 2:39 PM
 

Sharon,

I agree with the general theme of responses that the situation determines which voice would be used. Using the Mediator Voice would only be helpful if there is an ongoing tension or participants being stuck in their responses so the discussions come to a halt.

The voice that intregued me was the Role Play voice. I don't believe I have ever had an online instructor use that one and while role playing can be a breakthrough in understanding in face-to-face classrooms, I wonder how useful it would be for online faciltation. The effectiveness of this voice would be contingent on the skillfulness of the instructor. 

Sheilah

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